Category Archives: JMPs

The rapid rise of spatial economics among JMCs

Two years ago, my list of trade candidates also included a dozen candidates in spatial economics. Last year I listed 20 candidates. There are 45 spatial-economics JMCs in this year’s list. That looks like a rapid rise.

Of course, measurement problems abound. My view of “spatial economics” may have broadeneed during the last two years, in which case the listings would tell you more about me than about the candidates. That would be hard to quantify. But, to focus on one label within the broader spatial economics nexus, I’m pretty sure that I’m seeing more candidates explicitly list “urban economics” as one of their fields than in years prior.

If I’m right that the supply of spatial economists is rising, then one immediately wonders if the demand side will keep pace. I haven’t looked at JOE postings, but I doubt that ads mentioning “urban economics” are growing at the same rate as candidates listing it as a field.

Last month, in response to a Beatrice Cherrier query about why urban economics’ “boundaries & identity are so difficult to pin down,” Jed Kolko noted that “urban economists typically align strongly to another field — trade, labor, PF, finance (esp the real estate types), macro.” That fluidity has advantages and disadvantages. It certainly makes it challenging to compile a list of relevant job-market candidates. But my very short time series of arbitrarily collated candidates suggests growth in the supply of young spatial economists.

Spatial economics JMPs (2019-2020)

Here’s a list of job-market candidates whose job-market papers fall within spatial economics, as defined by me when glancing at a webpage for a few seconds. Illinois has six candidates! I’m sure I missed folks, so please add them in the comments.

The annual list of trade candidates is a distinct post.

Of the 45 candidates I’ve initially listed, 18 used Google Sites, 12 registered a custom domain, 3 used GitHub, and 12 used school-provided webspace.

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear in these papers’ titles:

Trade JMPs (2019-2020)

It’s November again. Time flies, and there’s a new cohort of job-market candidates. Time really flies: I started this series a decade ago! Many members of that November 2010 cohort now have tenure or will soon.

As usual, I’ve gathered a list of trade-related job-market papers. There is no clear market leader: the most candidates from one school by my count is three (Berkeley, Maryland, UCLA). If I’ve missed someone, please contribute to the list in the comments.

A separate post lists candidates in spatial economics, broadly defined.

Of the 31 candidates I’ve initially listed, 14 registered a custom domain, 9 used Google Sites, 2 used GitHub, and only 6 use school-provided webspace.

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear in these papers’ titles:

Spatial economics JMPs (2018-2019)

Last year, I comingled spatial-economics candidates with the trade JMCs. This year, I’m offering a separate list. Thanks to those who suggested spatial-economics candidates in response to my tweet. Since people working on spatial economics come from a variety of fields, I’ve listed candidate’s self-identified fields in brackets after their JMP title. I’m sure I missed folks, so please add them in the comments.

  • Clare-Balboni (LSE) – In Harm’s Way? Infrastructure Investments and the Persistence of Coastal Cities [Environmental, Trade, Development]
  • Chiara Fratto (Chicago) – The reallocative effects of mobility restrictions on workers and firms. An application to the West Bank [applied macro, urban, productivity, trade]
  • Xuan Fei (UC Davis) – Land Market Misallocation in China [International, Urban, Macro, and Chinese Economy]
  • Laurel Wheeler (Duke) – Property Rights, Place-Based Policies, and Economic Development [labor and development]
  • Dennis McWeeny (Wisconsin) – Spatial Competition in the Airline Industry [industrial organization, health, and regional]
  • Yanjun (Penny) Liao (UCSD) – How Hurricanes Sweep Up Housing Markets: Evidence from Florida [Environmental, Public]
  • Xueying Lu (UCSD) – Housing Markets and Automobile Policy [Environmental, Urban, Energy]
  • Cailin Slattery (Virginia) – Bidding for Firms: Subsidy Competition in the US [public finance, urban, industrial organization]
  • Mesay M. Gebresilasse (Boston U) – Rural Roads, Agricultural Extension, and Productivity [development and applied microeconomics]
  • Tatjana Kleineberg (Yale) – Can We Save the American Dream? A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis of the Effects of School Financing on Local Opportunities [Macro, Economic Development, and Urban]
  • Donghyuk Kim (Yale) – Government Incentives and Firm Location Choices [Industrial Organization, Urban, and Labor]
  • Max Perez Leon (Yale) – Inducing Labor Mobility? Evidence from Peruvian Teacher Reallocation [Labor, Urban, and Personnel]
  • Nicholas Li (Berkeley) – Housing Market Channels of Segregation [Labor, Urban, Development]
  • Qing Zhang (Columbia) – Sunlight, Development Restrictions, and Urban Density [Development, Political Economy, Urban]
  • Ben Klopack (Stanford) – One Size Fits All? The Value of Standardized Retail Chains [Industrial Organization, Urban, Public]
  • Zhezhi Hou (Binghamton) – Growing from Spillovers: A Semiparametric Varying Coefficient Approach [econometrics and applied microeconomics]
  • Soeren Henn (Harvard) – Complements or Substitutes: State Presence and the Power of Traditional Leaders [development and political economy]
  • Jessica Brown (Princeton) – Does Public Pre-K have Unintended Consequences on the Child Care Market for Infants and Toddlers? [public and labor]
  • Matthew Davis (Wharton) – The Distributional Impact of Mortgage Interest Subsidies: Evidence from Variation in State Tax Policies [Real Estate, Public Finance]
  • Simon Franklin (Oxford/LSE) – The demand for government housing: evidence from a lottery for 200,000 homes in Ethiopia [Development, Labour, and Urban]

Trade JMPs (2018-2019)

It’s already November again. Time flies. As I do annually, I’ve gathered a list of trade-related job-market papers. The market leader in trade this year is Penn State, which offers seven candidates. If I’ve missed someone, please contribute to the list in the comments. A few schools (e.g., UCLA, Yale) have not yet posted candidates.

[Nov 11 update: I’ve added a number of candidates since this was posted Nov 5. Now listing 40 people. I didn’t recompute stats nor word cloud.]

Of the 33 candidates I’ve initially listed, 16 use Google Sites, 8 registered their own domain, and only 5 use school-provided webspace (3 use Weebly; 1 GitHub).

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear at least twice in these papers’ titles:

tradejmps20182019wordcloud.png