Category Archives: JMPs

Spatial economics JMPs (2021-2022)

Here’s a list of job-market candidates whose job-market papers fall within spatial economics, as defined by me quickly skimming webpages. I’m sure I missed folks, so please add them in the comments.

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear in these papers’ titles:

Zahin Haque (NYU) – The Production Engel
Yuta Suzuki (Penn State) – Local Shocks and Regional Dynamics in an Aging Economy
Yao Wang (Syracuse University) – Linguistic Distance, Internal Migration and Welfare: Evidence from Indonesia
Xian Jiang (Duke) – Information and Communication Technology and Firm Geographic Expansion
Vladimir Avetian (Sciences Po) – Consider the Slavs: Overt Discrimination and Racial Disparities in the Rental Housing
Vinicios Sant’Anna (UIUC) – Send Them Back? The Real Estate Consequences of Repatriations
Vinayak Iyer (Columbia) – What Drives the Efficiency in Ridesharing Markets? Evidence from Austin, Texas
Victor Yifan Ye (BU) – Simulating Endogenous Global Automation
Vasily Rusanov (NYU) – Internal Migration and the Diffusion of Schooling in the US
Valentin Lindlacher (Munich) – Digital Infrastructure and Local Economic Growth: Early Internet in Sub-Saharan Africa
Taylor Mackay (UC Irvine) – Source of Income Discrimination and the Housing Choice Voucher Program
Tanner Regan (LSE) – Ask a local: Improving public pricing in urban Tanzania
Tal Roitberg (USC) – Can’t Wait? Urgency with Strategic Commuters and Tolled Express Lanes
Sung-Yup Jung (BU) – Industrial Parks and Regional Development: Evidence from South Korean Industrial Park Policy
Sarah Schneider-Strawczynski (PSE) – When is Contact Effective? Evidence on Refugee-Hosting and Far-Right Support in France
Rui Yu (Wharton) – Returns to Political Contributions in Local Housing Markets
Rolando Campusano (Toronto Rotman) – Startup Location, Local Spillovers, and Neighborhood Sorting
Philip Mulder (Wharton) – Mismeasuring Risk: The Welfare Effects of Flood Risk Information
Petr Martynov (Berkeley Haas) – Welfare Effects of Zoning: Density Constraints and Heterogeneous Agglomeration
Pawel Janas (Kellogg) – Public goods under financial distress: evidence from cities in the great depression
Paul J. Fisher (Arizona) – The Role of Property Tax in California’s Housing Crisis
Palak Suri (Maryland) – Public Transit Infrastructure and Employment Accessibility: The Benefits of the Mumbai Metro
Nikhil Datta (UCL) – Local Monopsony Power
Motaz Al-Chanati (Columbia) – Residential Segregation and the Demand for Schooling
Mingxi Li (UC Davis) – Firm Foundations: Legal Systems and Economic Performance in Colonial Shanghai, 1903-1934
Michael Pollmann (Stanford) – Causal Inference for Spatial Treatments
Matthew Lilley (HBS) – The Long Run Effects of Right to Work Laws
Mason Reasner (Purdue) – Agglomeration and Congestion Spillovers: Evidence from Base Realignment and Closure
Martin Jégard (PSE) – An Optimal Distribution of Polluting Activities Across Space
Manuela Puente Beccar (Bocconi) – Sorting and health: understanding health inequalities
Luca Perdoni (Yale) – The Effects of Federal “Redlining” Maps: A Novel Estimation Strategy
Kristina Komissarova (NYU) – Location Choices over the Life Cycle: The Role of Relocation for Retirement
Kohei Takeda (LSE) – On the Geography of Structural Transformation: Impact on Inequality and Upward Mobility
Juan Pablo Uribe (Brown) – Subsidies and Market Equilibrium: Evidence from a Notch in the Colombian Housing Market
Josh Morris-Levenson (Chicago) – The Origins of Regional Specialization
Jose Morales-Arilla (HKS) – Autocrats in crisis mode: Strategic favoritism during economic shocks
John Morehouse (Oregon) – Carbon Taxes in Spatial Equilibrium
Jaehee Song (Yale) – The Effects of Residential Zoning in U.S. Housing Markets
Iain Bamford (Columbia) – Monopsony Power, Spatial Equilibrium, and Minimum Wages
Hyun Yeol Kim (Rochester) – Internal U.S. Migration and Consumption Dynamics: A Panel Data Analysis
Georgios Tsiachtsiras (Barcelona) – Transportation Networks and the Rise of the Knowledge Economy in 19th Century France
Filippo Tassinari (Barcelona) – Low emission zones and traffic congestion: evidence from Madrid Central
Fernando Stipanicic (TSE) – The Creation and Diffusion of Knowledge: Evidence from the Jet Age
Fernanda Rojas-Ampuero (UCLA) – Sent Away: The Long-Term Effects of Slum Clearance on Children and Families
Elisa Facchetti (Queen Mary University of London) – Police Infrastructure, Police Performance and Crime: Evidence from Austerity Cuts
Dzhamilya Nigmatulina (LSE) – Misallocation and State Ownership: Evidence from the Russian Sanctions
Dheeraj Chaudhary (Maryland) – Trade, Financial Development, and Inequality: Evidence from US Railroads in the 19th Century
Derek Christopher (UC Irvine) – Homeownership in the Undocumented Population and the Consequences of Credit Constraints
Cory Briar (Oregon) – Rent Control and Gentrification in San Francisco: A Simulation Approach
Cora Wigger (Northwestern) – Decoupling Homes and Schools
Christopher M. Hair (Kellogg) – The Local Effects of Spatially Targeted Public Policies: Evidence from California School Finance Reform
Bunyada (Mos) Laoprapassorn (Michigan) – Entry and Spatial Competition of Intermediaries: Evidence from Thailand’s Rice Market
Benjamin Freyd (UCLA) – Labor Market Polarization and the Growth of Service Employment: Routinization or Consumption Spillovers?
Barthélémy Bonadio (Michigan) – Ports vs. Roads: Infrastructure, Market Access and Regional Outcomes
Arman Khachiyan (UCSD) – The Impacts of Fracking on Microspatial Residential Investment
Antoine Levy (MIT) – Tax Policy and Spatial Investment Behavior
Anomita Ghosh (UIUC) – Developing incentives to move new physicians: Longitudinal evidence from a local supply-side reform
András Jagadits (UPF) – Emigration and Local Structural Change: Evidence from (Austria)-Hungary in the Age of Mass Migration
Abhishek Rai (Penn State) – Temporary Migration in Spatial Economy

Trade JMPs (2021-2022)

For the 12th year running, I’ve gathered a list of trade-related job-market papers. It’s in reverse-alphabetical order by first name. If I’ve missed someone, please contribute to the list in the comments.

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear in these papers’ titles:

trade_words_2021

Zachary Kiefer (Oregon) – Extracting the Costs of International Internet Communcation
Yuting Gao (Indiana) – Lobbying for Trade Liberalization and its Policy Influence
Yuta Suzuki (Penn State) – Local Shocks and Regional Dynamics in an Aging Economy
Yu-Siang Wu (Michigan State) – Import Exposure and STEM Major Choice: Evidence from the U.S.
Youssef A. Benasser (Oregon) – Measuring Trade Policy Uncertainty and Its Impact on Financial Market Volatility
YongKi Hong (UCLA) – Related-Party Trades in Vertical Integration
Yoko Shibuya (Stanford) – Firm Size and Complementarity between Geography and Products
Yogeshwar Bharat (Michigan State) – Credit Constraints, Bank Incentives, and Firm Export: Evidence from India
Yao Wang (Syracuse University) – Linguistic Distance, Internal Migration and Welfare: Evidence from Indonesia
Xiaohan Zhang (Minnesota) – Increased degree of openness, technology capital and structural change in the U.S.
Torsten Jaccard (Toronto) – Who Pays for Protectionism? The Welfare and Substitution Effects of Tariff Changes
Tianchen Song (Rochester) – Multinationals Expansion, Shareholding Choice, and Local Know-How
Thu Tran (Vanderbilt) – Financial constraints and trade intermediation
Shihangyin (Frank) Zhang (Maryland) – Quantitative Effects of Trade Shocks Under Global Supply Chains
Ron Yang (HBS) – (Don’t) Take Me Home: Home Bias and the Effect of Self-Driving Trucks on Interstate Trade
Roman Merga (Rochester) – International Trade, Volatility, and Income Differences
Prakrati Thakur (UIUC) – Welfare Effects of International Trade in Waste
Nicholas Rowe (Michigan State) – When Does Finance Help Trade? Banking Structures and Export in the Macroeconomy
Mélina London (Aix-Marseille) – Trade Networks and Natural Disasters: Diversion, not Destruction
Md. Deen Islam (BU) – The Geography of Automation
Mayara Felix (MIT) – Trade, Labor Market Concentration, and Wages
Mathilde Munoz (PSE) – Trading Non-Tradables: The Implications of Europe’s Job Posting Policy
Maria-Jose Carreras-Valle (Minnesota) – Increasing Inventories: The Role of Delivery Times
Lydia Cox (Harvard) – The Long-Term Impact of Steel Tariffs on U.S. Manufacturing
Lidia Smitkova (Cambridge) — Competitiveness, ‘Superstar’ Firms and Capital Flows: The North-South Divide in Pre-Crisis Europe
Kairong Chen (Indiana) – Trade Policy Uncertainty: Measurement and Impacts on US firms in Global Value Chains
Jun-Tae Park (Michigan State) – The Welfare Effects of Labor Switching Costs in a Trade Economy
José-Luis Cruz (Princeton) – Global Warming and Labor Market Reallocation
John Finlay (Yale) – Exporters, Credit Constraints, and Misallocation
Jiacheng Feng (Harvard) – Signaling Export Quality under Firm Heterogeneity
Jeffrey Wang (Harvard) – Robots, Trade, and Offshoring: Perspective from US Firms
Jaedo Choi (Michigan) – Technology Adoption and Late Industrialization
Heehyun Rosa Lim (Maryland) – Trade in Intermediates and US Manufacturing Emissions
Hamza Zahid (Houston) – Global Footprints of US Energy Innovations: Energy Efficiency and Shale Revolution
Giulia Sabbadini (Graduate Institute) – Firm-Level Prices, Quality, and Markups: The Role of Immigrant Workers
Fernando Stipanicic (TSE) – The Creation and Diffusion of Knowledge: Evidence from the Jet Age
Evgenii Fadeev (Harvard) – Creative Construction: Knowledge Sharing in Production Networks
Elijah Coleman/ (Vanderbilt) – Patent Placement: Evaluating the Impact of the WTO/TRIPS on International Patenting Behavior
Conor Foley (UCLA) – Flexible Entry/Exit Adjustment for Price Indices
Chujian Shao (Washington) – International Trade, Immigration and Macroeconomic Dynamics
Brian Pustilnik (UCLA) – Trade Policy on a Buyer-Seller Network
Bin Zhao (Cornell) – Input Specificity, Firm-to-Firm Trade, and Firm Growth
Barthélémy Bonadio (Michigan) – Ports vs. Roads: Infrastructure, Market Access and Regional Outcomes
Aycan Katitas (Princeton) – Politicizing Trade: How Economic Discontent and Identity Politics Shape Anti-Trade Campaign Appeals

Spatial economics JMPs (2020-2021)

Here’s a list of job-market candidates whose job-market papers fall within spatial economics, as defined by me quickly skimming webpages. I’m sure I missed folks, so please add them in the comments.

Of the 27 candidates I’ve initially listed, 12 registered a custom domain, 8 used Google Sites, 3 used GitHub, 3 used school-provided webspace, and 2 used Weebly.

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear in these papers’ titles:

Aaron Weisbrod (Brown) – Housing Booms and Urban Frictions: The Impact of the 1917 Halifax Explosion on Local Property Values
Aleksandar Petreski (Jönköping University, Sweden)
Spatial-temporal asymmetry, shock and memory: housing transaction prices in Sweden
Andrew Simon (Michigan) – Public Good Spillovers and Fiscal Centralization: Evidence from Community College Expansions
Avichal Mahajan (Geneva) – Highways and segregation
Björn Brey (Nottingham) – The long-run gains from the early adoption of electricity
Brendan Shanks (LMU Munich) – Land Use Regulations and Housing Development: Evidence from Tax Parcels and Zoning Bylaws in Massachusetts
Christoph Albert (CEMFI) – Immigration and Spatial Equilibrium: the Role of Expenditures in the Country of Origin
Desen Lin (Penn) – Housing Search and Rental Market Intermediation
Dmitry Sedov (Northwestern) – How Efficient are Firm Location Configurations? Empirical Evidence from the Food Service Industry
Eduardo Fraga (Yale) – Drivers of Concentration: The Roles of Trade Access, Structural Transformation, and Local Fundamentals
Eunjee Kwon (USC) – Why Do Improvements in Transportation Infrastructure Reduce the Gender Gap in South Korea?
Ewane Theophile (UQAM) – Trade costs, prices and connectivity in Rwanda
Ezequiel Garcia-Lembergman (Berkeley) – Multi-establishment Firms, Pricing and the Propagation of Local Shocks: Evidence from US Retail
Franklin Qian (Stanford) – The Effects of High-skilled Firm Entry on Incumbent Residents
Gregor Schubert (HBS) – House Price Contagion and U.S. City Migration Networks
Ian Herzog (Toronto) – The City-Wide Effects of Tolling Downtown Drivers: Evidence from London’s Congestion Charge
Jacob Krimmel (Wharton) – Reclaiming Local Control: School Finance Reforms and Housing Supply Restrictions
Jan David Bakker (UCL) – Trade and Agglomeration: Theory and Evidence from France
Joanna Venator (Wisconsin) – Dual Earner Migration, Earnings, and Unemployment Insurance
John Pedersen (Binghamton) – Voting for Transit: The Labor Impact of Public Transportation Improvements
Jonathan Moreno-Medina (Duke) – Local Crime News Bias and Housing Markets
Kate Pennington (Berkeley ARE) – Does Building New Housing Cause Displacement?: The Supply and Demand Effects of Construction in San Francisco
Kenneth Tester (Kentucky) – The Effect of Taxes on Where Superstars Work
Magdalena Domínguez (Barcelona) – Sweeping Up Gangs: The Effects of Tough-on-crime Policies from a Network Approach
Marcos Ribeiro Frazao (Yale) – Brand Contagion: The Popularity of New Products in the United States
Margaret Bock (WVU) – Unintended Consequences of the Appalachian Development Highway System on Mortality
Mariya Shappo (Illinois) – The Long-Term Impact of Oil and Gas Extraction: Evidence from the Housing Market
Matthew Gross (Michigan) – The Long-Term Impacts of Rent Control on Renters
Meng Li (Queen’s) – Within-city Income Inequality, Residential Sorting, and House Prices
Miguel Zerecero (TSE) – The Birthplace Premium
Pablo E. Warnes (Columbia) – Transport Infrastructure Improvements, Intra-City Migration, and Spatial Sorting: Evidence from a BRT system in Buenos Aires
Pedro Tanure Veloso (Minnesota) – Housing Supply Constraints and the Distribution of Economic Activity: The Case of the Twin Cities
Piyush Panigrahi (Berkeley) – Endogenous Spatial Production Networks: Quantitative Implications for Trade and Productivity
Prottoy Aman Akbar (Pittsburgh) – Who Benefits from Faster Public Transit?
Rizki Nauli Siregar (UC Davis) – Global Prices, Trade Protection, and Internal Migration: Evidence from Indonesia
Sarah Thomaz (UC Irvine) – Investigating ADUS: Determinants of Location and Their Effects on Property Values
Sebastian Ellingsen (Pompeu Fabra) – Free and Protected: Trade and Breaks in Long-Term Persistence
Sebastian Ottinger (UCLA Anderson) – Immigrants, Industries and Path Dependence
Shiyu Cheng (Kentucky) – High-Speed Rail Network and Brain Drain: Evidence from College Admission Scores in China
Sydney Schreiner (Ohio State) – Does Gentrification Stop at the Schoolhouse Door? Evidence from New York City
Tianyun Zhu (Syracuse) – Estimating the Implicit Price Elasticity of the Demand for Neighborhood Amenities: A Hedonic Approach
Tillman Hönig (LSE) – The Legacy of Conflict: Aggregate Evidence from Sierra Leone
Timur Abbiasov (Columbia) – Do Urban Parks Promote Racial Diversity in Social Interactions? Evidence from New York City
Xiao Betty Wang (Wharton) – Housing Market Segmentation
Yiming He (Stanford) – The Economic Impacts of Slum Demolition on the Displaced: Evidence from Victorian England
Zibin Huang (Rochester) – Peer Effects, Parental Migration and Children’s Human Capital: A Spatial Equilibrium Analysis in China

Trade JMPs (2020-2021)

For the 11th year running, I’ve gathered a list of trade-related job-market papers. It’s in reverse-alphabetical order by first name. If I’ve missed someone, please contribute to the list in the comments.

Of the 38 candidates I’ve initially listed, 15 registered a custom domain, 13 used Google Sites, 4 used GitHub, 3 used Weebly and only 3 use school-provided webspace.

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear in these papers’ titles:

Ziho Park (Chicago) – Trade Adjustment: Establishment-Level Evidence
Zachary Kiefer (Oregon) – Extracting the Costs of International Internet Communication
Yuta Watabe (Penn State) – Triangulating Multinationals and Trade
Yusuke Kuroishi (LSE) – Value of Trademarks: Micro Evidence from Chinese Exports to Africa
Yoonseon Han (Kentucky) – Determinants of Export Earnings Volatility
Yang Zhou (Minnesota) – The US-China Trade War and Global Value Chains
Xiaochen Xie (Penn State) – Export Dynamics: Evidence from the Global Mobile Phone Industry
Xiao Ma (UC San Diego) – College Expansion, Trade, and Innovation: Evidence from China
Vu Thanh Chau (Harvard) – International Portfolio Investments with Trade Networks
Trang Hoang (Vanderbilt) – The Dynamics of Global Sourcing
Tomas Dominguez-Iino (NYU) – Efficiency and Redistribution in Environmental Policy: An Equilibrium Analysis of Agricultural Supply Chains
Todd Messer (Berkeley) – Foreign Currency as a Barrier to International Trade: Evidence from Brazil
Tanmay Belavadi (Penn State) – Informality, Inequality and Trade
Swapnika Rachapalli (Toronto) – Learning Between Buyers and Sellers Along the Global Value Chain
Sen Ma (Illinois) – Can Foreign Direct Investment Increase the Productivity of Domestic Firms? Identifying FDI Spillovers from Borders of Chinese Dialect Zones
Sebastian Ellingsen (Pompeu Fabra) – Free and Protected: Trade and Breaks in Long-Term Persistence
Samuel Bailey (Minnesota) – Competition and Coordination in Infrastructure: Port Authorities’ Response to the Panama Canal Expansion
Roza Khoban (Stockholm University) – The Impact of Trade Liberalization in the Presence of Political Distortions
Ross Jestrab (Syracuse) – Do Multilateral and Bilateral Trade Agreements Share the Same Motive? An Empirical Investigation
Rizki Nauli Siregar (UC Davis) – Global Prices, Trade Protection, and Internal Migration: Evidence from Indonesia
Priyam Verma (Houston) – Optimal Infrastructure after Trade Reform in India
Piyush Panigrahi (Berkeley) – Endogenous Spatial Production Networks: Quantitative Implications for Trade and Productivity
Paul Ko (Penn State) – Dissecting Trade and Business Cycle Co-movement
Monika Khan (Kentucky) – Finance and Trade: The Role of Stock Markets and Importers
Marius Faber (Basel) – Robots and Reshoring: Evidence from Mexican Labor Markets
Marijn Bolhuis (Toronto) – Financial Linkages and the Global Business Cycle
Lucas Zavala (Yale) – Unfair Trade: Market Power in Agricultural Value Chains
Kendrick Morales (UC Irvine) – Religious hostilities: A consequence of international trade?
Jan David Bakker (UCL) – Trade and Agglomeration: Theory and Evidence from France
Haruka Takayama (Virginia) – Greenfield or Brownfield? FDI Entry Mode and Intangible Capital
Haishi Harry Li (Chicago) – Multinational Production and Global Shock Propagation in the Great Recession
Gustavo Gonzalez (Chicago) – Commodity Price Shocks, Factor Utilization, and Productivity Dynamics
Ezequiel Garcia-Lembergman (Berkeley) – Multi-establishment Firms, Pricing and the Propagation of Local Shocks: Evidence from US Retail
Eduardo Fraga (Yale) – Drivers of Concentration: The Roles of Trade Access, Structural Transformation, and Local Fundamentals
Ebehi Iyoha (Vanderbilt) – Estimating Productivity in the Presence of Spillovers: Firm-level Evidence from the US Production Network
Daniel Bonin (Purdue) – To Greener Pastures: the Domestic Migration Response to Social Policies and Its Impact on Political Polarization
Daisuke Adachi (Yale) – Robots and Wage Polarization: The Effects of Robot Capital across Occupations
Christoph Albert (CEMFI) – Immigration and Spatial Equilibrium: the Role of Expenditures in the Country of Origin
Chenying Yang (UBC) – Location Choices of Multi-plant Oligopolists: Theory and Evidence from the Cement Industry
Bérengère Patault (CREST-Ecole Polytechnique) – How valuable are business networks? Evidence from sales managers in international markets
Bruno Conte (UAB) – Climate change and migration: the case of Africa
Brett McCully (UCLA) – Immigrants, Legal Status, and Illegal Trade
Arnold Njike (Université Paris Dauphine) – Trade in value-added and the welfare gains of international fragmentation
Armen Khederlarian (Rochester) – Inventories, Input Costs and Productivity Gains from Trade Liberalizations
Alexander Wise (Princeton) – Global Dynamics of Structural Change

The rapid rise of spatial economics among JMCs

Two years ago, my list of trade candidates also included a dozen candidates in spatial economics. Last year I listed 20 candidates. There are 45 spatial-economics JMCs in this year’s list. That looks like a rapid rise.

Of course, measurement problems abound. My view of “spatial economics” may have broadened during the last two years, in which case the listings would tell you more about me than about the candidates. That would be hard to quantify. But, to focus on one label within the broader spatial economics nexus, I’m pretty sure that I’m seeing more candidates explicitly list “urban economics” as one of their fields than in years prior.

If I’m right that the supply of spatial economists is rising, then one immediately wonders if the demand side will keep pace. I haven’t looked at JOE postings, but I doubt that ads mentioning “urban economics” are growing at the same rate as candidates listing it as a field.

Last month, in response to a Beatrice Cherrier query about why urban economics’ “boundaries & identity are so difficult to pin down,” Jed Kolko noted that “urban economists typically align strongly to another field — trade, labor, PF, finance (esp the real estate types), macro.” That fluidity has advantages and disadvantages. It certainly makes it challenging to compile a list of relevant job-market candidates. But my very short time series of arbitrarily collated candidates suggests growth in the supply of young spatial economists.

Spatial economics JMPs (2019-2020)

Here’s a list of job-market candidates whose job-market papers fall within spatial economics, as defined by me when glancing at a webpage for a few seconds. Illinois has six candidates! I’m sure I missed folks, so please add them in the comments.

The annual list of trade candidates is a distinct post.

Of the 45 candidates I’ve initially listed, 18 used Google Sites, 12 registered a custom domain, 3 used GitHub, and 12 used school-provided webspace.

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear in these papers’ titles:

Trade JMPs (2019-2020)

It’s November again. Time flies, and there’s a new cohort of job-market candidates. Time really flies: I started this series a decade ago! Many members of that November 2010 cohort now have tenure or will soon.

As usual, I’ve gathered a list of trade-related job-market papers. There is no clear market leader: the most candidates from one school by my count is three (Berkeley, Maryland, UCLA). If I’ve missed someone, please contribute to the list in the comments.

A separate post lists candidates in spatial economics, broadly defined.

Of the 31 candidates I’ve initially listed, 14 registered a custom domain, 9 used Google Sites, 2 used GitHub, and only 6 use school-provided webspace.

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear in these papers’ titles:

Spatial economics JMPs (2018-2019)

Last year, I comingled spatial-economics candidates with the trade JMCs. This year, I’m offering a separate list. Thanks to those who suggested spatial-economics candidates in response to my tweet. Since people working on spatial economics come from a variety of fields, I’ve listed candidate’s self-identified fields in brackets after their JMP title. I’m sure I missed folks, so please add them in the comments.

  • Clare-Balboni (LSE) – In Harm’s Way? Infrastructure Investments and the Persistence of Coastal Cities [Environmental, Trade, Development]
  • Chiara Fratto (Chicago) – The reallocative effects of mobility restrictions on workers and firms. An application to the West Bank [applied macro, urban, productivity, trade]
  • Xuan Fei (UC Davis) – Land Market Misallocation in China [International, Urban, Macro, and Chinese Economy]
  • Laurel Wheeler (Duke) – Property Rights, Place-Based Policies, and Economic Development [labor and development]
  • Dennis McWeeny (Wisconsin) – Spatial Competition in the Airline Industry [industrial organization, health, and regional]
  • Yanjun (Penny) Liao (UCSD) – How Hurricanes Sweep Up Housing Markets: Evidence from Florida [Environmental, Public]
  • Xueying Lu (UCSD) – Housing Markets and Automobile Policy [Environmental, Urban, Energy]
  • Cailin Slattery (Virginia) – Bidding for Firms: Subsidy Competition in the US [public finance, urban, industrial organization]
  • Mesay M. Gebresilasse (Boston U) – Rural Roads, Agricultural Extension, and Productivity [development and applied microeconomics]
  • Tatjana Kleineberg (Yale) – Can We Save the American Dream? A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis of the Effects of School Financing on Local Opportunities [Macro, Economic Development, and Urban]
  • Donghyuk Kim (Yale) – Government Incentives and Firm Location Choices [Industrial Organization, Urban, and Labor]
  • Max Perez Leon (Yale) – Inducing Labor Mobility? Evidence from Peruvian Teacher Reallocation [Labor, Urban, and Personnel]
  • Nicholas Li (Berkeley) – Housing Market Channels of Segregation [Labor, Urban, Development]
  • Qing Zhang (Columbia) – Sunlight, Development Restrictions, and Urban Density [Development, Political Economy, Urban]
  • Ben Klopack (Stanford) – One Size Fits All? The Value of Standardized Retail Chains [Industrial Organization, Urban, Public]
  • Zhezhi Hou (Binghamton) – Growing from Spillovers: A Semiparametric Varying Coefficient Approach [econometrics and applied microeconomics]
  • Soeren Henn (Harvard) – Complements or Substitutes: State Presence and the Power of Traditional Leaders [development and political economy]
  • Jessica Brown (Princeton) – Does Public Pre-K have Unintended Consequences on the Child Care Market for Infants and Toddlers? [public and labor]
  • Matthew Davis (Wharton) – The Distributional Impact of Mortgage Interest Subsidies: Evidence from Variation in State Tax Policies [Real Estate, Public Finance]
  • Simon Franklin (Oxford/LSE) – The demand for government housing: evidence from a lottery for 200,000 homes in Ethiopia [Development, Labour, and Urban]

Trade JMPs (2018-2019)

It’s already November again. Time flies. As I do annually, I’ve gathered a list of trade-related job-market papers. The market leader in trade this year is Penn State, which offers seven candidates. If I’ve missed someone, please contribute to the list in the comments. A few schools (e.g., UCLA, Yale) have not yet posted candidates.

[Nov 11 update: I’ve added a number of candidates since this was posted Nov 5. Now listing 40 people. I didn’t recompute stats nor word cloud.]

Of the 33 candidates I’ve initially listed, 16 use Google Sites, 8 registered their own domain, and only 5 use school-provided webspace (3 use Weebly; 1 GitHub).

Here’s a cloud of the words that appear at least twice in these papers’ titles:

tradejmps20182019wordcloud.png

Trade JMPs (2017-2018)

It’s that time of year again. As I’ve done since 2010, I’ve gathered a list of trade-related job-market papers. New this year is a small collection of spatial economics papers that aren’t about trade per se. If I’ve missed someone, please contribute to the list in the comments.

Spatial Economics