One way to increase access to the US labor market

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Tim Lee, writing for Ars Technica, describes a Silicon Valley startup aiming to facilitate the creation of more Silicon Valley startups by improving labor mobility:

Blueseed plans to buy a ship and turn it into a floating incubator anchored in international waters off the coast of California…

Immigration law makes it difficult for many would-be immigrants to get permission to work in the United States. For example, there’s an annual cap on the number of H1-B visas available for American employers to hire skilled immigrant workers. However, permission to travel to the United States for business or tourism is much easier to get.

Marty pointed to the B-1 business visa as a key part of his company’s strategy. With a B-1 visa, visitors can freely travel to the United States for meetings, conferences, and even training seminars. B-1 visas are relatively easy to get, and can be valid for as long as 10 years.
Blueseed plans to provide regular ferry service between the ship to the United States. While Blueseed residents would need to do their actual work—such as writing code—on the ship, Marty envisions them making regular trips to Silicon Valley to meet with clients, investors, and business partners…

Blueseed’s business model seems like a long shot. Buying, outfitting, staffing, and filling a 1,000-person ship seems like a tall order for even the most talented three-person team.

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