Look what I found…

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In the course of researching my job market paper, I read a lot of old or obscure literature related to the Linder hypothesis. It yielded some real gems. Unfortunately, I also unearthed some big disappointments. You’ll see what I mean in a moment.

For the moment, here’s the abstract of McPherson, Redfearn and Tieslau – “International trade and developing countries: an empirical investigation of the Linder hypothesis” in Applied Economics (2001), an article with 44 citations in Google Scholar:

This paper presents empirical evidence in support of the Linder hypothesis for five of the six East African developing countries studied here: Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan and Uganda. This finding implies that these countries trade more intensively with others who have similar per capita income levels, as predicted by Linder. The contributions of this research are three-fold. First, new information is provided on the Linder hypothesis by focusing on developing countries. Second, this is one of very few analyses to capture both time-series and cross-section elements of the trade relationship by employing a panel data set. Third, the empirical methodology used in the analysis corrects a major shortcoming in the existing literature by using a censored dependent variable in estimation.

Now, here’s the abstract of Bukhari, Ahmad, Alam, Bukhari, and Butt – “An Empirical Analysis of the Linder Theory of International Trade for South Asian Countries” in The Pakistan Development Review (2005), with zero citations in Google Scholar:

This paper presents empirical evidence in support of the Linder theory of international trade for three of the South Asian countries, Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan. This finding implies that these countries trade more intensively with countries of other regions, which may have similar per capita income levels, as predicted by Linder in his hypothesis. The contribution of this research is threefold: first, there is new information on the Linder hypothesis by focusing on South Asian countries; second, this is one of very few analyses to capture both time-series and cross-section elements of the trade relationship by employing a panel data set; third, the empirical methodology used in this analysis corrects a major shortcoming in the existing literature by using a censored dependent variable in estimation.

It continues like this, paragraph for paragraph. Finally, we arrive at Table 2 of each paper. Here’s McPherson, Redfearn and Tieslau:

McPherson

And here’s Bukhari, Ahmad, Alam, Bukhari, and Butt:

Bhukari

That’s Bangladesh-Kenya, India-Ethiopia, and Pakistan-Uganda with identical rows. The same thing occurs in Table 3. It continues, all the way through the concluding paragraphs.

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