Category Archives: Immigration

Tidbits

  • Language as a trade barrier – “[I]f knowledge of English in all European countries increased by ten percentage points, European trade would rise by up to 15% on average. Bringing all European countries up to the level of English proficiency enjoyed by the Dutch could increase European trade by up to 70%.”
  • The third edition of Doug Irwin‘s Free Trade Under Fire will be out in a few months.
  • Foreign athletes can now play in the US for more than ten years.
  • Robert Baldwin criticizes the botched special safeguard mechanism that caused so much trouble for the Doha negotiations back in July.
  • The benefits of highly skilled immigration: “If immigrants were merely displacing natives, increases in the H-1B quota should not have led to increases in innovation. But Messrs Kerr and Lincoln found that when the federal government increased the number of people allowed in under the programme by 10%, total patenting increased by around 2% in the short run. This was driven mainly by more patenting by immigrant scientists. But even patenting by native scientists increased slightly, rather than decreasing as proponents of crowding out would have predicted.”

Immigration increases the poverty rate — and that’s good!

What’s the implication of this paragraph by Mortimer B. Zuckerman?

So why haven’t overall poverty rates declined further? In a word — immigration. Many of those who come to the United States are not only poor but also unskilled. Hispanics account for much of the increase in poverty — no surprise, since 25 percent of poor people are Hispanic. Since 1989, Hispanics represent nearly three quarters of all increase in overall poverty population. Immigration has also helped keep the median income for the country basically flat for five straight years, the longest stretch of income stagnation on record.

Richard Lamm thinks that it is evidence that “illegal immigration is hurting U.S. taxpayers and the poorest Americans for the benefit of a few.”

I think it’s evidence that averages don’t characterize a distribution very well, especially for a changing population. If poverty rates are only stagnant because the newest members of the population are poor, then that is good news for Americans who have been around a while – their incomes are not as stagnant as the average or median suggests. And being a new American is good news for the “impoverished” too!

Who cares about the American poverty rate when we know that we’re making strides against global poverty through immigration?

[I know others have made this point countless times before, but a brief search yielded only articles drawing the exact opposite inference – that immigration’s contribution to poverty rates means it’s bad to let in immigrants.]

Exports that don't cross borders

Deemed exports:

Most companies recognize that U.S. export control laws apply to shipments of products or technical data out of the United States to another country. Despite recent efforts by the U.S. Department of Commerce to increase awareness about how the export control rules apply to other transactions, however, some companies still do not realize that the sharing of technology or source code with a foreign national is also an export – even when the foreign national is within the United States. Under the “deemed export rule” in the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), a transfer of technology or source code (except encryption source code) is “deemed” to be “an export to the home country or countries of the foreign national.”

Update: Professors take note!

[Hat tip: Sabrina]

Exports that don’t cross borders

Deemed exports:

Most companies recognize that U.S. export control laws apply to shipments of products or technical data out of the United States to another country. Despite recent efforts by the U.S. Department of Commerce to increase awareness about how the export control rules apply to other transactions, however, some companies still do not realize that the sharing of technology or source code with a foreign national is also an export – even when the foreign national is within the United States. Under the “deemed export rule” in the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), a transfer of technology or source code (except encryption source code) is “deemed” to be “an export to the home country or countries of the foreign national.”

Update: Professors take note!

[Hat tip: Sabrina]