Category Archives: Immigration

Exports that don’t cross borders

Deemed exports:

Most companies recognize that U.S. export control laws apply to shipments of products or technical data out of the United States to another country. Despite recent efforts by the U.S. Department of Commerce to increase awareness about how the export control rules apply to other transactions, however, some companies still do not realize that the sharing of technology or source code with a foreign national is also an export – even when the foreign national is within the United States. Under the “deemed export rule” in the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), a transfer of technology or source code (except encryption source code) is “deemed” to be “an export to the home country or countries of the foreign national.”

Update: Professors take note!

[Hat tip: Sabrina]

Turning nativism into a case for poverty

Daniel Griswold spots some anti-humanitarian arguments from an anti-immigration group:

[T]he Center for Immigration Studies released a report this morning with the headline, “Immigration to U.S. Increases Global Greenhouse-Gas Emissions.” The report argues that immigration “significantly increases world-wide CO2 emissions because it transfers population from lower-polluting parts of the world to the United States, which is a higher-polluting country.”

What the CIS study is really arguing is that rich people pollute more than poor people, so the world would be better off if more people remained poor.

I suspect the Center for Immigration Studies is more concerned about immigration than climate change, so they’d be happy if more people became rich, provided they stayed out of the United States. Concerns about pollution are just a cover. CIS: “Immigration helps people, so we’re against it.” Sheesh.

Let their footballers come

The Belfast Telegraph says that EU national teams are importing football talent through (presumably privileged) immigration openings:

[Marcos] Senna took Spanish nationality, enabling his club to field another non-EU player. Capped in March 2006, he was a starter in the ensuing World Cup…

Coaches and governments have realised that while countries are not allowed to use the transfer market to strengthen teams, they can use helpful immigration laws.

Since Brazil is the greatest producer of football talent in the world it follows that footballers most likely to be naturalised are from Brazil. Those playing at Euro 2008 are just the most visible tip of a ball-juggling mountain. There are Brazilians playing for Bosnia, Bulgaria and Hungary. Azerbaijan have four Brazilians playing for them – the recent spell as coach of Brazil’s 1970 World Cup captain, Carlos Alberto Torres, is undoubtedly a factor. Brazilians have been competing for Tunisia and Lebanon and for Japan and Qatar…

With globalisation the blurring of national allegiances is only going to increase, especially given the value of an EU passport to players from outside the union.

[HT: Emmanuel]

An “easy” solution to the food crisis

In Haiti, where three-quarters of the population earns less than $2 a day and one in five children is chronically malnourished, the one business booming amid all the gloom is the selling of patties made of mud, oil and sugar, typically consumed only by the most destitute. “It makes your stomach quiet down.”…

But experts say there are few quick fixes to a crisis tied to so many factors, from strong demand for food from emerging economies like China’s to rising oil prices to the diversion of food resources to make biofuels.

Well, I’ve got a quick fix. Give every Haitian a green card. Invite the world’s most precious resource – human labor – to leave a dirt-based economy and get an entry-level job in the modern economy. It’s called doing well while doing good. And unlike everything else the world has ever done for Haiti, it works.

It certainly would raise income per natural.

An "easy" solution to the food crisis

In Haiti, where three-quarters of the population earns less than $2 a day and one in five children is chronically malnourished, the one business booming amid all the gloom is the selling of patties made of mud, oil and sugar, typically consumed only by the most destitute. “It makes your stomach quiet down.”…

But experts say there are few quick fixes to a crisis tied to so many factors, from strong demand for food from emerging economies like China’s to rising oil prices to the diversion of food resources to make biofuels.

Well, I’ve got a quick fix. Give every Haitian a green card. Invite the world’s most precious resource – human labor – to leave a dirt-based economy and get an entry-level job in the modern economy. It’s called doing well while doing good. And unlike everything else the world has ever done for Haiti, it works.

It certainly would raise income per natural.

Binding quotas

Cato’s Ilya Shapiro reports on the binding H-1B quota:

April 1st is the day each fiscal year when employers are allowed to begin filing petitions with the US Citizen and Immigration Services for highly skilled workers to be given what are known as H-1B visas. For the second consecutive year, the quota of these visas was reached on this first day of eligibility…

As for the vast majority of employers and employees who will be out of luck, the immigration laws say, like so many “rebuilding” baseball teams this opening week, “wait till next year.” Except, in this case, next year means putting your business or career on hold until October 1, 2009—the day people who secure H-1Bs for fiscal year 2010 can start work.